A common misconception in fitness industry is that weightlifting can prevent your potential growth. Is it a true fact or merely a myth?
Let’s dig it up.


WHY DO PEOPLE BELIEVE WEIGHTLIFTING STUNTS GROWTH?
Often, the myth that lifting weights hinders growth stems from concerns that children may develop damage to their developmental plates if they participate in a strength training program.
The misconception that weight lifting inhibits growth stems from the fact that injuries to the growth plates in immature bones can inhibit growth. However, this is something that can be caused by poor shape, overweight, and lack of supervision and is not exactly the result of lifting weights.

Your growth plates are cartilaginous areas of tissue that grow at the ends of long bones. These plates become hard bone when the young body reaches maturity, but are soft during growth, so are more prone to damage. But just because growth plates can be damaged does not mean that a teenager or young person should avoid lifting weights.

DOES WEIGHTLIFIFTING REALLY STUNTS GROWTH?
The truth is that there is no scientific evidence that weight training affects the development of young people. Weight training does not automatically damage the growth plates.
Although there have been back-to-back case reports of developmental cartilage injury from pre-adolescence and adolescence with recurrent loads, most of these injuries were caused by improper lifting techniques, maximum lift, or lack of supervision by a qualified adult. Significantly, no prospective adolescent training research study has reported this type of developmental cartilage injury and there is no evidence that adolescent training adversely affects growth and maturity in childhood and adolescence.


HOW TO PREVENT INJURIES AND ACCIDENTS:
The key to avoiding damage to growth plates over the growing years – or avoiding any injuries in that regard – is to train safely. Avoid overweight and focus on shape and technique rather than lifting weights. Good supervision is also essential.
Injury or disease is more likely to occur if the intensity, amount, or frequency of training exceeds the young person’s abilities. This can be avoided by gradually increasing the need for the muscle and developing the ability of the muscle to meet that need in a sensible period of time.


FINAL TAKEAWAY:
By participating in strength training, youthful competitors create in numerous ways that lead to injury avoidance and even improved psychological well-being. By finding the correct program and environment, young competitors should grasp resistance training and start their athletic excursion likewise for ideal long haul development!

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